Pottery

Ancient Indus civilization and earlier pottery.

Terra cotta nodules

Terra cotta nodules and cakes of different shapes are common at most Indus sites. These objects appear to have been used in many different ways depending on their shape and size. The flat triangular and circular shaped cakes may have been heated and

Painted burial pottery

Painted burial pottery from Harappa. The two largest vessels were found in the same burial and are described below. The other smaller vessels were found in an earlier burial and represent an older style of pottery. Tall jar with concave neck and

Burial pottery

Collection of burial pottery without any painted designs. These vessels come from one of the later burials towards the end of the Harappan period, possibly dating to 1900 B. C.

Kiln setter

Part of a terra cotta kiln setter found in the Trench 54 South workshop debris. The tip is not vitrified and may have been buried in ash during the firing process.

Dish or lid

Late Harappan Period dish or lid with perforation at edge for hanging or attaching to large jar. It shows a Blackbuck antelope with trefoil design made of combined circle-and-dot motifs, possibly representing stars.

Pointed base goblets

The pointed base results from rapid manufacture off a fast wheel and makes it easy for stacking in the kiln. The grooves around the body may serve as a simple decoration, but they also allow for a better grip. Found only in the largest cities and

Dish-on-stand

Late Harappan Period Dish-on-stand from Harappa with a hole in the center of the dish that may have been used for a special ritual purpose. The dish is pedestaled on a heavy base with triple ridges.

Large burial urn

Late Harappan Period large burial urn with ledged rim for holding a bowl-shaped lid. The painted panel around the shoulder of the vessel depicts flying peacocks with sun or star motifs and wavy lines that may represent water.

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