Textiles and Basketry of the Indus Tradition: Archaeological Evidence and Historical Legacy

1:04:03

Jonathan Mark Kenoyer's Deccan College Lecture on April 10 2021 goes into the earliest evidence of textiles in the greater Indus Valley, from Mehrgarh in 7000 BCE through Indus times, digging into the specific varieties of cotton, linen, flax, silk and other plant fibers and even colours used. Illustrated and comprehensive, from an expert archaeologist who brings in evidence from other forms of expression like pottery and ornamentation that are linked to textile remnants.

The Indus Civilization Trade with the Umm an-Nar Communities of the Oman Penninsula: A New Paradigm

20:33

Dennys Frenez describes the extensive finds from the Indus civilization in Oman, including a variety of pottery types, seals, etched carnelian beads and more. Beautifully illustrated, includes the work of Jonathan Mark Kenoyer and Sophie Mery.

Coastal Crossroads: HD-1 Site at Ras a-Hadd, Sultanate of Oman

24:05

Jonathan Mark Kenoyer presents recent finds made by the Joint Hadd Project which includes Dennys Frenez and Maurizio Cattani (U. of Bologna, Italy) that has revealed a wide variety of Indus artifacts at this coastal site. From pottery, black-slipped jars from Mohenjo-daro, beads, cotton, steatite beads, drills and more that testify to the close links between HD-1 and the ancient Indus region between 2700 and 2000 BCE.

Short Report: A déjeté Levallois tool from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan) and the role it plays in the chronology of the Pleistocene terraces of the Bannu Basin

Very little is known about the subcontinent's history hundreds of thousands of years ago, say 300,000-30,000 years ago, which would have been the Middle Paleolithic period for example, except for small clues left at places like the Rohri chert (flint) mines and along the Indus in Sindh and else

Building a Bioarchaeology of Climate and Environmental Change: Multi-scalar approaches

1:32:26

A wide-ranging, illustrated talk on bioarchaeology and climate change, and the many misconceptions people have about the latter. In the case of the ancient Indus Valley civilization for example, the inhabitants demonstrated many strategies for dealing with varying environmental conditions, so that attributing the decline of the civilization to climate change is likely incomplete. Dr. Schug deals with more than the ancient Indus civilization, but also looks at Indus sites and some of the recent finds at Sinauli.

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