The first in-depth look at stone beads from Indus sites besides Harappa, in this case two just south of Rakigarhi. Stone beads include those made of steatite (the vast majority, about 91%), carnelian (8%), as well as jasper, agate, lapis luzuli, limestone and more. Steatite and carnelian beads are found at levels corresponding to all time periods.
A well-illustrated 140 slide PDF that explores the Indus script, origins, writing direction and more. While the slides by Indus scholar Dennys Frenez lack his narration, many of the slides are self-explanatory and provide a rich visual overview of the Indus civilization its writing and the many issues involved.
Jonathan Mark Kenoyer's Deccan College Lecture on April 10 2021 goes into the earliest evidence of textiles in the greater Indus Valley, from Mehrgarh in 7000 BCE through Indus times, digging into the specific varieties of cotton, linen, flax and other plant fibers and even colours used.
Dennys Frenez describes the extensive finds from the Indus civilization in Oman, including a variety of pottery types, seals, etched carnelian beads and more. Beautifully illustrated, includes the work of Jonathan Mark Kenoyer and Sophie Mery.
Jonathan Mark Kenoyer presents recent finds made by the Joint Hadd Project which includes Dennys Frenez and Maurizio Cattani (U. of Bologna, Italy) that has revealed a wide variety of Indus artifacts at this coastal site.
Very little is known about the subcontinent's history hundreds of thousands of years ago, say 300,000-30,000 years ago, which would have been the Middle Paleolithic period for example, except for small clues left at
An audio interview with Dr. Jonathan Mark Kenoyer with Wisconsin Public Radio explores his work and discoveries at Harappa, where stone tools suggest the area was inhabited as early as 10,000 BCE. An fine hour of highlights and key finds around crops, animals and culture and evidence for the earliest curries and writing.
A wide-ranging, illustrated talk on bioarchaeology and climate change, and the many misconceptions people have about the latter. In the case of the ancient Indus Valley civilization for example, the inhabitants demonstrated many strategies for dealing with varying environmental conditions, so that attributing the decline of the civilization to climate change is likely incomplete.
An exciting find, not only because this is the first foodstuff preserved in such excellent condition, but also for the continuity with today, is this Times of India article on multi-grain, high-protein laddos found at the 4MSR site in Rajasthan on the border with Pakistan.
The results of two seasons of excavations 2012-2014 at a small site to the west of Rakigarhi in Rajasthan, on the modern River Chautang (Drishdavati). Largely destroyed by irrigation construction a few years previously – "it can now be assessed that at least 70% of the fortified settlement was destroyed" write the authors (p. 16) – Karanpura has nevertheless yielded an impressive set of artifacts from about 2800-2000 BCE.

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